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  • alexandra1847

Larry receives numerous questions regarding college admissions from applicants and their families. This week he answers a question about test scores reported by colleges in the mid 50% range.


Q: How can so many schools list their ACT (or comparable SATs) in the mid 50% range as 31 to 34. Are there enough total students scoring in that range to fill half the spots at so many schools? Or are their stats inflated?


A: Yes. Indeed 75% of such a class has scores at or above that range. One caveat to consider, though, is that where many students apply without testing (Test Optional) those figures skew upwards. How much they are skewed depends on the percentage of students submitting or not submitting scores, which is reported to the same two data collectors that are the most reliable sources for the various aggregators you might read. The sources are the Common Data Set (private) and iPeds (Federal).


If you are wondering if you should submit your test scores or have other questions about college admissions, please contact Larry at larry@learningassoc.com to learn more about our program.

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  • alexandra1847

Larry receives numerous questions regarding college admissions from applicants and their families. This week he addresses a topic that comes up quite often and creates a lot of confusion - weighted vs. unweighted GPAs.


Q: How do colleges compare students at different schools with weighted and unweighted GPAs?

A: Selective colleges are interested in the unweighted GPA. Then they factor in the rigor of the student's program, sometimes using a uniform weighting rubric but often without a rubric but by subjective evaluation. Although you didn’t ask, many colleges recalculate GPA using only core subjects. Those A+’s in Gym and Driver’s Ed therefore disappear.


If you have questions pertaining to college admissions or would like to learn more about our program, please contact Larry Blumenstyk at larry@learningassoc.com.

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  • alexandra1847

Larry receives numerous questions about college admissions from applicants and their families. This week he addresses a question about repeating a year in boarding school.


Q: Will applying to a boarding school as a repeat junior affect my college application?

A: Aren’t you doing this to either advance your education, improve upon a weak academic year, or add another year of sports training? Well, then, yeah - it will affect your college application, and hopefully in a positive way. However, the upward or downward trajectory depends on you.


In our College Admissions Counseling program, Larry works with students of all academic profiles and extracurricular interests. Holly, Director of Learning Associates, offers School Placement services to families seeking admission to private day and boarding schools. If you would like to learn more about these services, contact Larry at larry@learningassoc.com or Holly at holly@learningassoc.com.

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